ServiceTechMag.com > Issue XVI: March 2008

Issue XVI March 2008

Working with SOA and RUP

Solmaz Boroumand

Solmaz Boroumand

The Rational Unified Process (RUP) has been a successful methodology used to support object-oriented project delivery because it provides a series of proven disciplines and practices, several of which can still be leveraged in support of SOA, particularly in the areas of business modeling and service-oriented analysis. This article explores combining specific parts of RUP with the Mainstream SOA Methodology in support of improving the required business modeling processes that support the definition of service inventory blueprints and individual service candidates. Methodologies are a lot like collections of best practices organized into a formal framework. Since service-orientation and service-oriented architecture have become the focal point in the IT community, several approaches and platforms for the delivery of SOA projects have been suggested by companies and research centers, but few constitute an actual methodology. The Rational Unified Process (RUP) developed by Rational Software in the 1990's emerged in support of object-oriented solution delivery to provide a collection of customizable techniques and...


SOA Engineering Misconceptions

Ted Barbusinski

Ted Barbusinski

We have all been saturated with information from credible sources underscoring the risks, as well as the potential for ROI, associated with strategic IT SOA investments. In a recent press release [REF-1], Gartner noted that "bad technical implementations", as well as a lack of governance, are key contributors to the risk of failure in strategic SOA initiatives. Although the issue of governance is frequently addressed by various sources, the causes of "bad technical implementations", and the foundations for SOA technical excellence, are often misunderstood. This is the first of a two articles that intend to offer some insights into evaluating and adjusting the technical direction of an SOA investment with an eye toward technical excellence and enduring ROI. Within this first part, we establish a basic understanding of SOA engineering goals and provide a frank overview of common misconceptions that can cause SOA technical implementations to become problematic. Part two of this article subsequently examines SOA engineering focal points and success factors that are foundational to successful SOA technical implementations. Before we can design for "increased ROI", we need to understand what that means relative to...


Refactoring Considerations for Service-Enabling Applications

Dr C P Jois

Dr C P Jois

Service-based computing is taking traction, and why not, services hold the visionary promise of transforming the manner in which software is built, distributed and managed. The standards are evolving and are making services more mature and absolutely more implementable than ever before. According to a Gartner forecast from several years ago, by the end of 2008 SOA will provide the basis for 80 percent of development projects. This is a remarkable prediction considering it wasn't so long ago that many in the industry were complaining of a lack of mature SOA platforms. To truly achieve a state of service-orientation, you need to apply many of the best practices that have been documented by industry experts. But, doing so within the context of specific business requirements can be challenging. In the realm of an enterprise contemplating a services-based engineering approach to developing solutions for the business the one factor to note is that most, if not all, business software solutions are evolutionary in nature. This means that they leverage existing software investments and enhance them to deliver increased business value. It is at this point that the services approach encounters perhaps its greatest obstacles because we, as service architects, are then forced to think in terms of...


Service-Orientation and Object-Orientation
Part II: A Comparison of Design Principles

Thomas Erl

Thomas Erl

This two-part article series studies object-orientation and service-orientation by providing a comparison of goals, concepts, and principles. Both articles are comprised of excerpts from the book "SOA: Principles of Service Design" [REF-1]. If you haven't already, be sure to read the first part of this article series [REF-5] before continuing. The object-orientation design paradigm is comprised of a rich set of fundamental and supplemental design principles that structure and organize object logic within and across classes. Several of these principles have been carried over into service-orientation to varying extents, while others have been omitted entirely. This article discusses how service-orientation relates to each of the following object-oriented design principles: • Encapsulation • Inheritance • Generalization and Specialization • Abstraction • Polymorphism • Open-Closed Principle (OCP) • Don't Repeat Yourself (DRY) • Single Responsibility Principle (SRP) • Delegation • Association • Composition • Aggregation. By understanding the relationship between object-oriented and service-oriented design we can identify several specific origins of individual service-orientation principles. More importantly, though, we can establish how specifically services are designed differently from objects...


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