ServiceTechMag.com > Archive > Issue XXXVIII: April 2010

Issue XXXVIII, April 2010

Effective Top-down SOA Management
in an Efficient Bottom-up Agile World - Part I

Philip Wik

Philip Wik

As with politics and religion, information technology has its armies that fight for great truths in the name of half-truths. And one great half truth is that Agile and SOA are incompatible. On the face of it, that seems true. Service-oriented architecture must be top-down in conception and execution for it to be effective. Agile is a bottom-up systems development methodology that emerges from self-organizing collectives. SOA and Agile have both demonstrated their value and have firmly established themselves in the marketplace. And yet the experience of more than a decade at many hundreds of firms has exposed flaws in how SOA and Agile are practiced in the real world where vast resources are at stake. The purpose of this article is to reconcile these two paradigms into a complementary partnership...

Understanding Service Composition
Part I: Dealing With Workflow Across Services

John deVadoss

John deVadoss

Whenever a service composes another service, meaning that one service uses the capabilities of another service or services to perform its own tasks, usually by means of workflow technologies, autonomy will be affected. In other words, when your service directly depends on one or more services the level of freedom and control you have in developing the service will be limited. The level of control over different runtime characteristics may also be affected. If you make synchronous calls to another service you will affect the control over runtime resources, such as threads. If you need to wait for the response of another service before you can return a response from your service, you depend on that other service in terms of response times. That translates into reduced predictability of how your service performs. To make matters more challenging, response times are often regulated by SLAs...

XML Appliances for Service-Oriented Architectures

Thomas Rischbeck

Thomas Rischbeck

XML appliances are a type of SOA intermediary that typically comes in hardware form factor and addresses the security threats associated with modern XML architectures. They are primarily geared towards security enforcement, monitoring and transformation. More recently, XML appliances also made inroads into the area of SOA management and governance. XML appliances contain hardened chips that can process XML in specialized circuits, at “wire-speeds”. This yields high throughput and low latency, which are relevant criteria for deployment at the network perimeter. Many SOA security issues and XML-specific threats can be detected very efficiently by XML appliances. They allow turn-key deployment because of the hardware form factor...

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