ServiceTechMag.com > Archive > Issue LIII: August 2011

Issue LIII August 2011

SOA in the Telco Domain - Part I

Masykur Marhendra

Masykur Marhendra

Telecommunication is a critical industry in any geographical area. Technology is rapidly developing, especially in voice and data services. Currently, voice services are becoming ordinary products with more becoming free of charge. All telecommunication providers are competing to deliver these services with promotions into product packages which give free additional voices/data services or another free package. This effort been made to increase the number of subscribers, and maintain the subscriber's loyalty. Meanwhile, internet expansion and the simplicity of access make the data services growth rapid, even if it has more usage than short message services. Most telecommunication subscribers use data services daily, especially for those professionals that have high mobility and high demand of fast information retrieval. Several subscribers still use short message services, but the traffic is not higher than the data services. We can say that short message services have reached their saturation point; there is no additional technology that can be adopted and developed on this service. Delivering a high-availability application on a revolutionary business process is recommended. The high demands from any marketing department to fulfill subscriber...


Service-Oriented Architecture and Business Intelligence

Philip Wik

Philip Wik

Once upon a time, there were three little pigs and the time came for them to leave home and seek their fortune. The first little pig built his home out of straw because it was the easiest thing to do. The second little pig built his house out of sticks, and the third little pig built his house out of bricks. Many fairy tales hinder the effective use of a service-oriented architecture. Business intelligence promises to turn data into insights, and insights into decisions and actions. It's a tool that drives decisions with guided applications, ad-hoc analysis, interactive dashboards, scorecards, key performance indicators, alerts, and geospatial visualizations. BI promises to marginalize information technology construction in favor of client self-service. It proposes to go from well-defined questions to any answer that might arise, from what to why. It's a front-line weapon that allows us to rapidly launch promotions, address issues, and negotiate product pricing. Business intelligence justifies SOA. Both SOA and BI can use open interoperability and reusable, loosely coupled services that can be shared across the enterprise. SOA releases BI's value when analysis is rendered immediately...


Understanding Service-Orientation - Part I: Business Goals

Raj Balasubramanian, Benjamin Carlyle, Cesare Pautasso

Raj Balasubramanian Benjamin Carlyle Cesare Pautasso

Service-orientation is an approach to distributed computing that encompasses its own design paradigm, design principles, design pattern languages, and related technologies, concepts, and frameworks. Service-orientation builds upon past distributed computing approaches and adds new design principles, problem solving approaches, and governance challenges. Information technology infrastructure is a key asset for modern businesses. Business increasingly depends on this infrastructure to remain agile in the face of rapidly changing business environments. The traditional approach to delivering information technology solutions has been to identify the business tasks to be automated, define their business requirements, and then build the corresponding solution logic based on available technology foundations. If the business needs a new process automated, an application is built from scratch to automate that process. This is an accepted and proven approach providing a relatively predictable return on investment, but has its drawbacks as well as advantages. Solutions built on this classical approach can be seen as "disposable applications". They can be quickly engineered with a narrow requirements focus to achieve a particular business objective. When processes or business needs change, a new application is developed...

Empowering the Discipline of Cloud Integration - Part IV

Pethuru Cheliah

Pethuru Cheliah

Integration as a Service (IaaS) is all about taking the functionality of business integration (intra as well as inter-enterprise integration) and putting it into the cloud, providing for a smooth data and message transport between any enterprise application and SaaS applications in the online, on-demand, and off-premise cloud. Users subscribe to IaaS as they would do for any other SaaS application. Cloud middleware, alternatively cloud integration bus (CSB), is the next advancement of traditional middleware solutions. Due to varying integration requirements and scenarios, there are myriad types of middleware and broker technologies, and products such as JMS, APIs, EAI, EII, ESB etc. Enterprise service bus (ESB) is for service integration. Composite data services are for data integration. There are message oriented middleware (MOM) and message brokers for integrating decoupled applications through message passing and pick up. For capturing, processing, and extracting any actionable information, insights, trends, threats, tips, prescribing patterns and usable associations out of streams of events from diverse, distributed and decentralized sources and resources, there are event processing engines that receive...


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