ServiceTechMag.com > Archive > Issue LXXVI, September 2013

Download Issue
Download Full Service Technology Magazine PDF

Some Key Cloud Security Considerations

Manish Dave, Toby Kohlenberg, Stacy Purcell, Alan Ross, Jeff Sedayao

Toby Kohlenberg

Alan Ross

Jeff Sedayao

This article discusses the evolution of integration in the manufacturing sector, highlighting the pros and cons of the various approaches that have been successively adopted before selecting SOA as the most effective choice. This article also discusses the implementation of governance initiatives when applying SOA-based solutions to achieve overall Integration success. Nowadays, manufacturing companies are facing challenges to become more flexible and agile as business models change. There has been a great deal of concern regarding speed deployment with reduced ongoing maintenance and support costs. The ability of companies to quickly adapt to a changing business environment depends on the agility of their corporate culture, flexibility of the business processes they incorporate, and the interoperability they employ. Enterprises are required to support open industry standards (SLA) and integrations that are easy to maintain and less risky to evolve, in addition to withstanding the necessary upgrades. Another driver of business change is the increasing number of regulations that the government and other agencies have imposed on manufacturing companies. Companies must trace not only the main products through their entire lifecycles until they reach the consumer, but also the secondary products that are derived from the core manufacturing process. To tackle these issues, service-oriented architecture has been used to leverage industry standards that allow for complete, integrated, best-of-breed, and plug-and-play types of architecture for IT systems. Cloud security has been a hot topic for the past several years, garnering attention of enterprises as well as researchers and providers, who seek ways to ensure appropriate risk mitigation and information protection within...


SOA and User-Interfaces

Jürgen Kress, Berthold Maier, Hajo Normann, Danilo Schmiedel, Guido Schmutz, Bernd Trops, Clemens Utschig-Utschig, Torsten Winterberg

Jürgen Kress Berthold Maier Hajo Normann
Danilo Schmiedel Guido Schmutz Bernd Trops Clemens Utschig-Utschig Torsten Winterberg

The interaction between user-interfaces and services in an SOA is an often-neglected topic. This article focuses on the particular challenges that need to be overcome when creating user-interfaces while entire process chains have to be called and interacted with. After outlining some general architectural considerations, we will describe a practical application of Thomas Erl's UI Mediator pattern that will be accompanied by our own technical experience. In the simplest scenario, a user's interaction with a business process consists of initiating the process and awaiting the result. However, processes very rarely run completely automatically, meaning human intervention in a process cycle is an important requirement. The WS-HumanTask specification can fulfill this requirement in the SOA environment. A standardized API that is defined for a workflow service can be used to fill a mailbox with tasks. If the process automation language BPEL is used, the BPEL4People specification defines how this mailbox functionality can be directly used in the process cycle by means of the WS-HumanTask or BPMN specification. For example, if manual approval or the input of additional data is needed during a process cycle, the process can determine the correct actor and deposit the task in their mailbox via the task service. The HumanTask service provides a Web service API for this functionality. The users receive the entries in their mailbox and process the pending tasks sequentially, while the process resumes its work in...


Mobile OS Architecture Trends - Part II

Kerry Jiang, Xiao-Feng Li, Bingwei Liu, Yong Wang, Weihua Jackie Wu

This article discusses the evolution of integration in the manufacturing sector, highlighting the pros and cons of the various approaches that have been successively adopted before selecting SOA as the most effective choice. This article also discusses the implementation of governance initiatives when applying SOA-based solutions to achieve overall Integration success. Nowadays, manufacturing companies are facing challenges to become more flexible and agile as business models change. There has been a great deal of concern regarding speed deployment with reduced ongoing maintenance and support costs. The ability of companies to quickly adapt to a changing business environment depends on the agility of their corporate culture, flexibility of the business processes they incorporate, and the interoperability they employ. Enterprises are required to support open industry standards (SLA) and integrations that are easy to maintain and less risky to evolve, in addition to withstanding the necessary upgrades. Another driver of business change is the increasing number of regulations that the government and other agencies have imposed on manufacturing companies. Companies must trace not only the main products through their entire lifecycles until they reach the consumer, but also the secondary products that are derived from the core manufacturing process. To tackle these issues, service-oriented architecture has been used to leverage industry standards that allow for complete, integrated, best-of-breed, and plug-and-play types of architecture for IT systems. Cloud security has been a hot topic for the past several years, garnering attention of enterprises as well as researchers and providers, who seek ways to ensure appropriate risk mitigation and information protection within...


2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006